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<span data-tracking="true" data-track-id="pending-1-0" class="fr-highlight-change"><figure class="table"><table><tbody><tr><td><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">Number sense develops when students connect the numbers to their own real-life experiences and skills related to counting, recognizing numbers, patterns, and sequences, comparing numbers, and estimating (Berch, 2005; Dyson et al., 2015; Jordan &amp; Levine, 2009). Number sense not only involves being capable of calculating operations but also involves students having the ability to connect these calculations to their own experiences and background knowledge</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">Number sense refers to a group of key math abilities to identify and conceptualize numbers. From a very early age, we focus on students identifying different quantities and understanding what those numerals mean—students identifying numbers in many different forms, order numbers, and build numbers and the relationship that enables students to interpret new problems, in results that they remember. Vygotsky, 1978). He viewed interaction with peers as an effective way of further developing skills and strategies (McLeod, 2018; Vygotsky, 1978).</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">Vygotsky further extended on his theory by introducing the concept of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and the more knowledgeable other (MKO) (McLeod, 2018; Kearns, 2012; Churchill et al., 2019; Vygotsky, 1978)</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">The application and development of mathematical knowledge happen through a student's ability to think, with number sense and numeracy being an important part of this. One concept used to help develop the number of number sense is counting, using addition skills, which is used to corroborate knowledge of the number names and number sense.</span><br><br>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>According to Bishop (1989), counting is an activity that is 'stimulated by, and in turn, affects the cognitive process of classifying and pattern-seeking.<span style="color:black;">&nbsp;Students can use counting to reinforce and extent on natural learning; activities that focus on counting have shown to be practical in helping students understand the concept of numbers. Students need the opportunity to experience numbers using various objects in a variety of ways (MacMillan, 2009). The teacher needs to plan and incorporate fun, hands-on rich learning experiences to help students develop their knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts such as counting. Counting is beneficial because it connects students' knowledge of quantity, place value, and other mathematical operations. The use of counting allows students to develop their own strategies.</span></p><p><span style="color:black;"><i>Teacher scaffolds learning with an understanding of what the child knows and the next point of learning. Examples of this are.</i></span></p><p><i>Students learn using hands-on, concrete material; students work outside; students work in groups; learning environments support learning.</i></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">Students construct the knowledge and build on existing ones. However, Teachers are expected to reflect on their practices to ensure the best outcomes are provided to the children and encourage children to assess their learning (Olusegun, 2015).&nbsp;</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">Teachers need to consider that students learn differently. While a student could be working in maths and above the level expected within the Australian Curriculum, another student might be struggling due to the student's limited mathematics and numeracy experiences.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="color:black;">Developmental delay is another factor that acts as a hurdle for student’s educational journey. Several environmental factors play a significant role in students learning and the knowledge acquired from a particular experience.</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><span style="color:black;">Research shows that building partnership and collaborating with families allows children to thrive in their learning, students will be supported by the teacher, as well as providing teachers with feedback on the students learning and progression at home (Goos, Jolly, 2004)</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p></td></tr></tbody></table></figure></span><p style="text-align:justify;"><span data-tracking="true" data-track-id="pending-1-1" class="fr-highlight-change"><span data-tracking-deleted="true" class="fr-tracking-deleted" contenteditable="false">Social entrepreneurship is the solution for raising the challenges of sustainable development<span data-tracking="true" data-track-id="pending-1-0" class="fr-highlight-change">.</span><span data-tracking="true" data-track-id="pending-1-1" class="fr-highlight-change"><span data-tracking-deleted="true" class="fr-tracking-deleted" contenteditable="false">,</span></span> <span data-tracking="true" data-track-id="pending-1-1" class="fr-highlight-change"><span data-tracking-deleted="true" class="fr-tracking-deleted" contenteditable="false">which</span></span> <span data-tracking="true" data-track-id="pending-1-0" class="fr-highlight-change">This </span>requires improving living conditions for all individuals without an increase in the use of natural resources; as the civilization of a nation is measured by the level of per capita income, far from developing its characteristics, advantages, and human contributions.</p><p style="text-align:justify;">The value and effectiveness of social capital are focused on social relations, cooperation, and trust for achieving economic goals, and it consists of social networks; networks of civic participation, and common customs that have an impact on the productivity of the society, and have a value that affects the productivity of an individual or group. The social sector is considered a key factor for the success of democracy and political participation (Wolf, 2009).</span></span></p>
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Journal article 2021-09-21T07:52:21.994000 avatar دراسات وأبحاث Done
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Number sense develops when students connect the numbers to their own real-life experiences and skills related to counting, recognizing numbers, patterns, and sequences, comparing numbers, and estimating (Berch, 2005; Dyson et al., 2015; Jordan & Levine, 2009). Number sense not only involves being capable of calculating operations but also involves students having the ability to connect these calculations to their own experiences and background knowledge

 

Number sense refers to a group of key math abilities to identify and conceptualize numbers. From a very early age, we focus on students identifying different quantities and understanding what those numerals mean—students identifying numbers in many different forms, order numbers, and build numbers and the relationship that enables students to interpret new problems, in results that they remember. Vygotsky, 1978). He viewed interaction with peers as an effective way of further developing skills and strategies (McLeod, 2018; Vygotsky, 1978).

 

Vygotsky further extended on his theory by introducing the concept of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and the more knowledgeable other (MKO) (McLeod, 2018; Kearns, 2012; Churchill et al., 2019; Vygotsky, 1978)

 

The application and development of mathematical knowledge happen through a student's ability to think, with number sense and numeracy being an important part of this. One concept used to help develop the number of number sense is counting, using addition skills, which is used to corroborate knowledge of the number names and number sense.

 

 

According to Bishop (1989), counting is an activity that is 'stimulated by, and in turn, affects the cognitive process of classifying and pattern-seeking. Students can use counting to reinforce and extent on natural learning; activities that focus on counting have shown to be practical in helping students understand the concept of numbers. Students need the opportunity to experience numbers using various objects in a variety of ways (MacMillan, 2009). The teacher needs to plan and incorporate fun, hands-on rich learning experiences to help students develop their knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts such as counting. Counting is beneficial because it connects students' knowledge of quantity, place value, and other mathematical operations. The use of counting allows students to develop their own strategies.

Teacher scaffolds learning with an understanding of what the child knows and the next point of learning. Examples of this are.

Students learn using hands-on, concrete material; students work outside; students work in groups; learning environments support learning.

 

Students construct the knowledge and build on existing ones. However, Teachers are expected to reflect on their practices to ensure the best outcomes are provided to the children and encourage children to assess their learning (Olusegun, 2015). 

 

Teachers need to consider that students learn differently. While a student could be working in maths and above the level expected within the Australian Curriculum, another student might be struggling due to the student's limited mathematics and numeracy experiences. 

Developmental delay is another factor that acts as a hurdle for student’s educational journey. Several environmental factors play a significant role in students learning and the knowledge acquired from a particular experience.

 

Research shows that building partnership and collaborating with families allows children to thrive in their learning, students will be supported by the teacher, as well as providing teachers with feedback on the students learning and progression at home (Goos, Jolly, 2004)

 

 

Social entrepreneurship is the solution for raising the challenges of sustainable development., which This requires improving living conditions for all individuals without an increase in the use of natural resources; as the civilization of a nation is measured by the level of per capita income, far from developing its characteristics, advantages, and human contributions.

The value and effectiveness of social capital are focused on social relations, cooperation, and trust for achieving economic goals, and it consists of social networks; networks of civic participation, and common customs that have an impact on the productivity of the society, and have a value that affects the productivity of an individual or group. The social sector is considered a key factor for the success of democracy and political participation (Wolf, 2009).

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